L’chu N’ran’nah is an
egalitarian traditional bencher
with an alternative edge.

It is rich in explanations, insightful commentary, and inclusive liturgical alternatives for celebration, thanks, and prayer. This user friendly bencher features a linear translation, placing Hebrew, English, and transliteration all on the same line.

It is true to traditional Hebrew texts but ready to adjust language when necessary to address the diversity of contemporary Jewish life in matters of gender and belief. The book is fully egalitarian, with a gender-neutral translation and equal ritual status for men and women.

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About the Tenth Anniversary (5th) Edition

L’chu n’ran’nah! Come, let us sing! This phrase from the first of the Kabbalat Shabbat psalms invites us to honor and celebrate Shabbat with song and blessing. This bencher extends that invitation by presenting liturgies for the blessings after the meal, kiddush for Shabbat and Festivals, z’mirot, and popular songs, in an attractive user-friendly format. 

What makes this bencher so special?

It is easy to use and fully transliterated.

This bencher uses a three-column linear format–transliteration, Hebrew text, and translation appear side by side on each page. Raised dots separate syllables in transliteration, making it easier to read. 

It provides alternatives. 

Benching options include complete, abbreviated, and contemporary. Within the text, optional insertions are given in square brackets. Alternatives, from which to choose one, are given between angle brackets

It is both accessible and scholarly.

Efforts have been made to produce as accurate a Hebrew text as possible. The notes point to biblical and rabbinic sources and explain difficult passages. 

It has a contemporary, faithful, gender-neutral translation.

This bencher uses a three-column linear format–transliteration, Hebrew text, and translation appear side by side on each page. Raised dots separate syllables in transliteration, making it easier to read. 

It is fully egalitarian and inclusive.

Benching options include complete, abbreviated, and contemporary. Within the text, optional insertions are given in square brackets. Alternatives, from which to choose one, are given between angle brackets

It has more songs!

This new edition includes a 32-page supplement with an eclectic mix of z’mirot, Yiddish songs and other songs–old favorites, as well as the recently popular. 

About the editors...

Barry Dov Walfish

is a Judaica Librarian ( U of Toronto; emeritus) and scholar of Medieval Biblical Exegesis and Karaism. He is the author or editor of numerous articles and books in these and other areas of Jewish Studies. He is one of the editors of Siddur Chaveirim kol Yisraeil . 

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Ben Dreyfus

teaches physics at George Mason University in Virginia, and is on the organizing team of Minyan Segulah on the DC/Maryland border.

Mark Frydenberg

is a past chair of the National Havurah Committee, and past president of Temple Beth Israel in Waltham, MA. He dabbles in creative liturgy and is the main editor of Siddur Chaveirim kol Yisraeil . 

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Aviva Richman

teaches at Hadar Institute.  She enjoys singing zemirot and niggunim with family and friends on shabbat over a nice bowl of soup.

Miriam-Simma Walfish

teaches at the Hadar Institute where she is also a coach for Pedagogy of Partnership. She and her daughter Adira learn the weekly Torah portion together in the podcast Torah Time.  

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Order your copy today!